Dog with Nausea

We sat for a very sweet old dachshund three times…she is the sweetest (I know, aren’t they all…but she is…), and sadly, she is not well. Her pet parents took her to the vet and the bloodwork came back showing her liver enzymes were off the chart. The doc “thinks” she may have a tumor on her liver. She also had very high white blood cell count. The vet gave her antibiotics and another med for her liver. Now she has nausea and won’t eat. This means giving her meds is not happening very well.
Any suggestions? We already mentioned ice to lick on, bone broth, chicken, chicken and rice, peanut butter (which is able to do if rubbed on her gums).
Thanks in advance - this could be helpful in the future for other sick pups too.

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We cared for a pup that had a tumor (ultimately terminal) and we tried everything we could to make sure she was getting calories in. The only thing we found to work was peanut butter. We’d hold her in our lap and over about 15 minutes put small amounts on her gums and right below her nose. She’d lick it up and we’d add a bit more. We tracked the calories and reported back to the homeowners frequently. It was messy and required clean up of the area and her nose and face, but it got the job done.

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Thank you for your input…I think so far, peanut butter is the main thing working for her. They are also trying pediolyte and molasses. Positive side is that she is drinking water, going pee pee, and spent some outdoor time in the sun…which she loves! #peanutbutterrocks

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The best thing, of course, is to find something the pet likes and hide the medication in it. Unfortunately, pets are very adept at „unpacking“ pills and spitting them out. So if it does not work with tasty things, it is better to administer it by hand. Spending time and nerves one or more times a day does not help anyone. The key to success is to place the medicine deep in the throat. Then the pet cannot spit it out. If you trust the pet, use your hand. If not, something like this will help.

google pet tablets dispenser

It is not funny, but it is quick, and that’s better than struggling with it every time.

If they are pills, please do not simply crush them. Some pills are designed that they do not dissolve in the stomach but only in the intestine. Ask the doctor or pharmacist if it is ok to crush these drugs. There are also small tools for this.

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I always gave my cat and my dog médecines (pills or liquid) hidden or mixed in “vaches qui rit” (the french name, i just checked on Internet, sold under the name of “the laughing cow” in USA)
it’s a kind of cream of molten cheese easy to swallow. No need to put any medicine in the throat. They loved it
.20210307_090318

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The “the laughing cow” a significant childhood memory for me.

Now I had to google it. Facts that I didn’t know. The german webpage says it’s been around since 1921 and is sold in 136 countries worldwide. So there is a chance to meet someone somewhere in the world who knows it. That’s funny.

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We are a country of cheese ! More than 400, but for amateurs, la vache qui rit is not a cheese.

Dogs and cats don’t give a damn, they love that. iIt’s a real help for

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Hi Lisa so sorry to hear about this little dog, thank you for all you are doing to support her owner.

As @StefanK says place the pills directly deep in the throat, keep the muzzle firmly but gently closed and stroke the throat encouraging the swallowing reflex , but only if this is safe to do so, for both dog and human.

Consult the vet or dispensing pharmacist (or meds info) and if the medication can be crushed and liquidized (mixed with suitable fluids) can be administered with a syringe.

I’ve just consulted with my daughter on this … she is an ER & Critical Care Vet.

As well as the pet’s own vet, sitters can access the Vet Line while on a sit and owners have access at anytime during their membership. Getting the professional opinion of a vet is always a priority when any pet is giving cause for concern.

Do let us know how this little one goes on.

Thank you all so much @Angela-CommunityManager @ScrewTheAverage @Provence @StefanK we all really appreciate the feedback, which I passed on to the pet parents. Here’s a photo of the sweet pup :slight_smile:

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I call this the “magical cheese” as it worked for all doggos I have met to take their medicines. They really seem to enjoy the texture and taste even when they are desperately ill and refuse to eat their food.

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Hi everyone, Millie’s pet parents wanted to be sure I let you know how much they appreciate your input. Sadly, Millie has crossed the rainbow bridge…she did so at peace and surrounded by family. It was simply her time, and she was an elder dog. We took care of her three times, and had the most joyous experience exploring the farm with her, and playing “Silly with Millie” time to get her up and moving. Our hearts are heavy … they really do become part of our family too.
thanks again.

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Lisa, we are so sorry to hear this sad news, please pass on our sincere condolences to Millie’s pet parents and to you we send our thoughts and a big family hug.

The pets we care for become as our own and we feel the profound sadness at each passing but the happy and loving memories always remain in our hearts.

Angela and the Team

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Thank you so much Angela :heart:

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i know how sad you must feel. i faced the death of a pet last summer, a very old cat (21 years). Even if it was not mine, even if I have known her only 3 days, even if the HO had warned us it could happen during our stay, it was hard.

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Thank you Provence, it is always hard but worth the love we share in our short time with these lovely pets. I am sorry for your loss too :orange_heart:

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