What food do you take on flights?

@BruceT … somehow I agree with your wife! :rofl:

@Jilly I love the frozen idea. what a great approach. Thanks.

@Kelownagurl I love the applesauce and running gel suggestions. Small, easy to carry and easy to digest. Thanks!

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Oh my! I hadn’t thought of that. Thanks for the tip @Petermac!

@Vanessa-ForumCMgr yes, nut allergies can be bad, so I’m hoping to stay away from them, just in case. Dried fruits sound good. Thanks.

@Cin I’m sorry your flights were so delayed. Good for you for being prepared. I appreciate your low carb suggestions – thanks!

Thanks @ElsieDownie for the empty water bottle reminder!

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(…In a fit of rage that her ear plugs weren’t working, she ripped open her bag of Starburst Jellies and shoved a few in each ear. That solved one problem but created another…) :rofl:

Sorry, I couldn’t resist. It is good to have a backup to chew on for take offs and landings. Thanks for the reminder @Mslaura

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Oh no, the dreaded apple bomb! :rofl: I’m glad Mr Itchyfeet’s rucksack was just delayed, not taken by someone else.

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Oh no, banana essence! :rofl: I hadn’t thought of that. I’ll be sure to wrap whatever I take well and toss anything that’s left when the flight attendants come around before landing in Montreal. Hopefully neither my backpack nor I will smell like contraband :rofl:

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@Karen-Moderator I’m usually sleeping in the airport before an early morning flight and I worry about them sitting around get warm so freezing them alleviates that worry. For the airport (before going through security) it’s also handy to have a small carton of orange juice, or similar, frozen as well. It may still be cool by the time you drink it and also keeps the sandwiches cool.
This habit stems from my hill walking days when a cold drink at the top of a hot mountain was very welcome.

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Wow! Just touching something someone who’s touched nuts touched. That’s good to know. Thanks @Kelownagurl

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@jilly I’ve been a hiker for most of my life, mostly in hot or hot/humid places. I’ve never thought of taking a frozen drink with me, but now will. Thanks!

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We use an old boy scout trick of filing a polycarbonate/Nalgene bottle about 1/3 full of water and freezing it on its side. On hike day, remove from freezer and fill the rest of the way with water. You’ll have a nice cold drink all day long if you wrap with a tea towel. Run warm water over lid if frozen closed. This works better for hikes than flights since airport security requires one to drain water bottles. It works well if you angle the bottle in the freezer, see below.

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Awesome idea! Thanks @BruceT

One of my go-to’s is a ramen bowl/cup and I ask a flight attendant for hot water when I’m ready to eat it, the only risk is sometimes the hot water is not hot enough and also it’s better to bring your own utensil because sometimes they won’t have any plastic forks. I also like to bring my own tea for a nice treat and ask for hot water for that too.

In recent years I’ve started rejecting the airplane meals, a lot of times I personally find it tastes too bad to eat and I hate wasting food and packaging…anyone else?

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I rarely eat any of the food on an airplane.

I always carry a folding “spork” when I travel. Comes in handy for eating all sorts of things.

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If I can, I go to a Whole Foods to stock up before my flight. At their cheese counter, they have tiny little samples of separately-wrapped cheeses that are only a couple of dollars. You can try something exotic – though I do always ask to make sure it’s a low-odor type. Then I buy a couple of individual hard rolls, like rosemary rolls or whatnot, and on the plane I just alternate bites of cheese and bites of roll. Grapes or blueberries – some fruit that’s easy to eat. Dried fruit. I do bring nuts, but they’re always in a separate, sealed little baggie, so if an announcement is made about allergies, I don’t even open the bag. Chocolate-covered almonds are a favorite treat.

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I always try to guage myself for the length of flight v time of day. It’s well known that pressurized cabin air can do funky things to the human digestive tract : / Air pressure in the cabin is lower than at sea level. As cabin pressure falls while flying, gas starts to expand (uh oh). As a result, pressure in in everyone’s digestive system can rise. Overeating before or during a flight can exacerbate this (double oh oh). Turns out trains aren’t the only mode of transport that can say “toot toot, all aboard”!

To avoid the above, I try to stick to “dry and light” foods and have a “meal” once back on terra firma again.

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Those are great suggestions! Thanks @Betsy.

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